Infographics

 

11 30 2016

Small Loans To Big Business Infographic

11 30 2016

From Small Loans To Big Business

Nearly all large corporations have humble beginnings as small businesses. And for many, the road to becoming a big business was paved with financial assistance, in form of small business loans or infusions of working capital. Our infographic below, From Small Loans To Big Business, illustrates the business financing journey that some of the nation’s largest companies have taken on their road to success.

From small loans to big business

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From Small Loans to Big Business

How some industry leaders used limited means to achieve their dreams

 

Dominoes

How It Started
1960 - Tom and Jerry Monaghan bought DomiNick's in Ypsilanti, Michigan, and a 15-min pizza-making lesson became Domino's.

How Much It Took
Borrowed $900

Annual Sales Revenue: $1,990,000,000

Key Moments

  • Opened 11,000 stores (5,000+ outside the U.S.), serving 1.5M pizzas a day globally.
  • AnyWare Ordering: Customers can order through text, tweet, smart TV, car, smart wtaches, voice, desktop, mobile, and tablet.

 

Chipotle

How It Started
1993 - Steve Ells Opened Chipotle, selling affordable burritos with fresh and sustainable ingredients.

How Much It Took
$85,000 loan from dad

Annual Sales Revenue: $826,900,000

Key Moments

  • 1996: 3rd location funded by SBA loan
  • 1998: McDonald's invested $360M and funded nationwide expansion
  • 2006: Went public, McDonald's fully divests from Chipotle

 

Ben and Jerry's

How It Started
May 1978 - Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield opened 1st Ben and Jerry's in Burlington, Vermont, after a $5 ice cream making course.
How Much It Took
$12,000 ($4,000 borrowed)

Annual Sales Revenue: $132,000,000

Key Moments

  • 2015: Opened total of 586 scoop shops, both in U.S. and internationally
  • Originally offered 12 flavors (Vanilla being 1st), now offers 41 flavors (ex. Cherry Garcia)

 

Bonobos

How It Started
Stanford Business School roommates Brian Spaly and Andy Dunn created online business for better-fitting pants.
How Much It Took
Borrowed $200,000 - $100,000 each from Joel Peterson and Andy Rachleff (Stanford GSB faculty members)

Annual Sales Revenue: $69,300,000

Key Moments

  • Largest online U.S. clothing brand with distribution in Nordstrom's 118 stores and 20 of its own retail showrooms.
  • Known for "Bonobos ninjas," who deliver net promoter score of 88

 

Warby Parker

How It Started
2010 - Wharton MBA students Neil Blumenthal, Dave Gilboa, Jeffrey Raider, Andrew Hunt launched Warby Parker as an alternative to expensive glasses.

How Much It Took
Started with less than $400,000 - less than $150,000 of their own money, plus a $50,000 line of credit, and a $200,000 loan from a regional bank.

Annual Sales Revenue: $35,000,000

Key Moments

  • Opened total of 14 in-store locations from Seattle, San Francisco, New Orleans, New York, and 4 showroom locations.
  • Try-On program: Participants have posted 25,000 images on Warby Parker's Facebook and 40,000+ on Instagram since launched in February 2010.

 

Steve Madden

How It Started
With only $1,100 in the bank, Madden used credit to manufacture 500 pairs of the "Marilyn" and sold samples from his car trunk.

How Much It Took
$1,100 and credit

Annual Sales Revenue: $1,330,000,000

Key Moments

  • 2015: Steve Madden retail stores located in 25 states in the U.S. and in 42 countries worldwide.
  • 5 business segments: wholesale footwear, wholesale accessories, retail, 1st cost, and licensing, with 7 divisions in wholesale

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Any applications submitted electronically shall have the same force and effect as if the application bore an inked original signature(s). The above information, together with any accompanying financial statements, schedules, or other materials, is submitted for the purpose of obtaining credit and is warranted to be true, correct, and complete.

 

US Patriot Act:

To help the government fight the funding of terrorism and money laundering activities, Federal law requires all financial institutions to obtain, verify, and record information that identifies each person and business that seeks a business loan. What this means for you: When you apply for a loan, we will ask for your business name, address, and Tax Identification Number. We will also ask for your name, address, date of birth, and other information that will allow us to identify you. We may also ask to see your driver’s license or other identifying documents.

 

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I hereby certify: (1) the information provided is true and correct, (2) you are hereby authorized to investigate all bank, credit, and trade references, and said references are hereby authorized to release any requested information to you or your nominee, (3) such authorization shall extend to obtaining personal credit profile in considering this application and subsequently for the purposes of update, renewal or extension of such credit or additional credit and for reviewing or collecting the resulting account, (4) this information may be transmitted by us to you and by you to underwriter(s) for the purpose of granting me credit, either electronically or manually, and that by submitting this application, I take full responsibility for transmission thereof, (5) I am over 18 years of age, (6) I acknowledge my rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, (7) I consent to receive direct mail, faxes, text-messages, and e-mails sent by National Funding and its affiliates for the purposes of transmitting account updates, requests for information and notices, and (8) this request is for business and not for consumer purposes.

 

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